Archive for January, 2011

Tennessee Wild Film Series

January 31, 2011

Reporting:  Rabbit Zielke

Beginning February 4th, Tennessee Wild will be hosting a film series in Chattanooga Tennessee.   Each of the four films in this series features the wilderness and was selected by outdoor and wilderness enthusiasts.  The films will be shown at green|spaces at 63 East Main Street in Chattanooga.  Doors open at 7:30 pm, film at 8:00.  There is limited seating so plan to arrive early.

Jeremiah Johnson is the first film in the series and is rated PG-13.  Tennessee Wild hopes the film series will bring members of the community together to socialize, enjoy outdoor themed movies and learn more about the wilderness areas in Southeast Tennessee.  There will be an opportunity for discussion after the film.

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Exploring Wellness Lecture Series

January 31, 2011

Reporting:  Rabbit Zielke

Allied Eye Associates will be hosting a weekly lecture series beginning February 1st with a focus on overall health and wellness.  This free series will feature local medical professionals and educators speaking on topics such as exercise, nutrition and maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

The lectures will be held every Tuesday from February 1st through May 31st at Allied Eye Associates, located at 7405 Shallowford Road Suite 420, near the intersection of Shallowford and Gunbarrel Roads.  Reservations are required.  Call 423-933-0013 or 423-855-8522 extension 235 for more information.

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“Three Penny Opera” opens for Ensemble Theatre of Chattanooga

January 31, 2011

Reporting: Monessa Guilfoil

Directed by Garry Lee Posey

Music Direction by John Thomas Cecil

Stage Managed by Jamie Goodnight

Set Designed by Christy Gallo

ETC begins its 3rd year with the first full musical production in its history.

Here’s a bit more about this early 20th Century musical adapted from John Gay’s “Beggars Opera” by Brecht and Weill from Culturevulture.net author Arthur Lazere:

First performed  in Berlin in 1928, Brecht’s text is sardonic and brittle. He creates a world of beggars, thieves, and prostitutes in which there is no honor; every character would sell out any other if an advantage is to be gained. Relationships are fluid, changeable; betrayals abound as new alliances are formed amongst the array of seedy, colorful characters.
Jonathan Peachum is the king of beggars, here an entrepreneur. Brecht portrays the beggars, thieves, and prostitutes as capitalists, running businesses for a profit. Peachum has the instincts of a contemporary market researcher:

Macheath (“Mack the Knife”) heads up the thieves division. His men tremble before him, he’s got the police well greased, and women compete for his sexual attentions. He has impregnated his lover, Lucy, he marries Peachum’s daughter Polly, and he still has a passionate connection with hooker Jenny.
For this cynical scenario, Weill wrote a score that has become part of Western culture’s consciousness: jazzy, syncopated, dissonant, and full of inventive melody, it captures the essence of the mocking, ironic tone of the book.

Following is an original cast recording featuring  Lotte Lenya:


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Puzzles

January 28, 2011

Reporting:  Rabbit Zielke

This is the final piece in the four-part series on puzzles in celebration of National Puzzle Day, January 29th.  Adam Anderson is the community relations manager at Barnes and Noble and shared information about whats popular and whats new in the puzzle industry.

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Previous segments in this series:

Part 1:  Children and Puzzles

Part 2:  Families and Puzzles

Part 3:  Alzheimer’s Disease and Puzzles

 

 

 

Puzzles Reduce the Effect of Alzheimer’s Disease

January 27, 2011

Reporting:  Rabbit Zielke

Saturday, January 29th is National Puzzle Day. This is the third in a four-part series looking into the impact of puzzles on our lives. Amy French from the Chattanooga Alzheimer’s Association discusses how puzzles can help build neural pathways and reduce the effect of Alzheimer’s Disease. Puzzles provide for fun and entertaining exercise for your brain and promote good brain health.

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Author Jay Searcy Pens The Last Reunion

January 26, 2011

REPORTING: MICHAEL EDWARD MILLER

Imagine this: out in the wilderness of East Tennessee, an entire town appears practically overnight.  Thousands of people live and work in this small, strange city, and all those people are keeping a secret.  What these people are doing in the town is, arguably, the greatest military secret of all time.

It’s a true story, and today, we’re going to hear an eyewitness account.  Jay Searcy grew up in the small town with the big secret.  If his name sounds familiar, he used to be a sports writer at the Chattanooga Times.  He also used to work at the The New York Times and The Philadelphia Inquirer.  He’s been writing professionally his whole life, and he recently published a memoir called The Last Reunion: The Class of 1952 Comes Home to The Secret City.

I interviewed Searcy at the River Gallery in Chattanooga, where he was signing copies of his book.

Listen to the interview.

Families and Puzzles

January 26, 2011

Reporting:  Rabbit Zielke

Saturday January 29th is National Puzzle Day.   This is the second in a four-part series on the impact of puzzles in our lives.  Julie Baumgardner, executive director of First Things First, discusses solving puzzles together as a family as part of a healthy approach to keeping the family together.  Establishing traditions like holiday jigsaw puzzles generate fond memories for everyone in the family.

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In-Town Gallery Presents pARTnership

January 25, 2011

January will be over in a few days, but there’s still time to visit the In-Town Gallery in Chattanooga and check out their new exhibit.  It’s called pARTnership.  It’s unusual because people who’ve never worked together before are collaborating at the In-Town Gallery.

"Flutter," mixed-media collaboration by Jennie Kirkpatrick and Linda Thomas

Listen to an interview with Jennie Kirkpatrick and Linda Thomas, two of the artists.

Children and Puzzles

January 25, 2011

Reporting:  Rabbit Zielke

Saturday January 29th is National Puzzle Day.  This is the first in a four-part series on the impact of puzzles in our lives.  Gayle Coleman, Director of the Early Learning Center at the Siskin Children’s Institute downtown Chattanooga discusses puzzles and early childhood development.  Children love to explore  the world around them and every activity presents a puzzle to the developing mind.  Working with puzzle pieces and manipulatives encourages eye to hand coordination while learning to fit items into their places supports emerging critical thinking skills.  Simple games and playground equipment also develops skills that help solve puzzles as the child grows and develops.

Kid Source Online provides some simple tips to include puzzles in your child’s life that can help develop math and language skills as well as fine tuning social interaction to achieve common goals.

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Urban League offers Volunteer Income Tax Assistance

January 25, 2011

Reporting: Monessa Guilfoil

From the Urban League Website:

More than 45,000 households in Chattanooga qualify for free tax service through the Urban League’s VITA program, but fewer than 3,700 of them take advantage of the program.

The VITA Program Coordinator,Donna Thomas along with more than 50 volunteers work in 13 different sites around Chattanooga to assist families and individuals who make less than $50,000/year with free tax preparation.

Here’s more from the VITA page on the Urban League’s website:

During tax season each year, the Urban League of Greater Chattanooga coordinates the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program in partnership with the City of Chattanooga, the IRS, and the United Way of Greater Chattanooga. Offering free tax preparation services to low- to moderate-income individuals and families, the VITA program served 3,409 individuals and families during the 2010 tax season, resulting in more than $4 million in tax refunds that were reinvested in the local economy.

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